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Audition Notices

Auditions for Georgia Ensemble Theatre’s productions of “Cat On a Hot Tin Roof” and “Night Must Fall” will be held by appointment only on Sunday, May 12 from 6p – 10p and Monday, May 13 from 9:30a – 1p and 4p – 10p at the Roswell Cultural Arts Center (950 Forrest Street, Roswell, GA 30075). Audition spots are limited. Please email Michael Vine at mvine@nullget.org to schedule an appointment (email only - no phone calls please). 

 

"Cat On a Hot Tin Roof” 
by Tennessee Williams 
Directed by James Donadio 

SEEKING EQUITY AND NON-EQUITY PROFESSIONAL ACTORS 

Brick – Male, 30s.  

Margaret – Female, 30s 

Mae – Female, 30s 

Gooper – Male, 30s 

Big Mama – Female, 60s  

Big Daddy – Male, 60s 

Reverend Tooker – Male, 50s/60s 

Doctor Baugh – Male, 50s/60s 

*The Role of Margaret has been cast. 

Please be prepared to audition in a realistic Southern (Mississippi) dialect. 

Rehearsals beginning August 20th, 2019. Previews September 10th and 11th. Performances September 12th-29th (Wednesdays 7:30p, Thursdays-Saturdays 8p, Saturdays 4p, Sundays 2:30p). 

 

“Night Must Fall” 
by Emlyn Williams 
Directed by Shannon Eubanks 

DIRECTOR’S NOTES AND CHARACTER BREAKDOWN - NIGHT MUST FALL 

We will be setting the show in Connecticut in the mid-1930’s, probably near New Canaan, which was a favored place for moneyed New Yorkers to build summer homes and cottages, to which they then later retired. To that end, play against the Cockney dialects suggested in the Nurse and Mrs. Terence, Americanize the dialogue pronunciation.  Mrs. Bramson, Hubert, and Olivia can have the mid-Atlantic pitch found in style pieces from the 1930’s. Dora and Dan have soft Irish accents —- they came to the States as children in the last wave of Irish immigrants to NY, so the accent is not as fulsome as it once was; but at the time it was indicative of a working-class destiny. 

Please do not watch any of the film versions of this play, it will not serve you. We’ll be interpreting the characters through a later psychological lens. Use the descriptions below for guidance. 

The script moves from the humorous to the suspenseful and terrifying, so in early scenes be sure to look for the comedic moments in this dysfunctional group of people. 

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SEEKING EQUITY AND NON-EQUITY PROFESSIONAL ACTORS 

MRS. BRAMSON: Hypochondriacal to a fault, is consistently domineering and manipulative, can swing from bellicose to Camille on a moment’s notice. Purrs like a kitten when flattered, can be snotty and savage when thwarted. 60’s-70’s 

OLIVIA: Smoldering sensuality under very tight wraps. Bookish in aspect until later in the play, when we see her beauty and sexuality. Reads and writes dark, brooding poetry; probably a Bronte fan and a Heathcliff fantasist. 28-32 

HUBERT: An affable, conciliatory sort possessed of no sexual magnetism whatsoever. The kind of unremarkable nice man that would be a good solid catch for an unremarkable nice gal, of which there are none in this play. 35-50 

DAN: Utterly and effortlessly charming and attractive. At first we may think he is a bit slow, as he seems so completely unaffected and ingenuous. We come to learn that Dan is capable of becoming whatever is necessary to meet any person’s needs: son, lover, cheerful companion or dangerous adversary —- Dan is, quite simply, capable of anything.  28-early 30’s   See dialect note above. 

MRS. TERENCE: Humorous in her absolute humorlessness, Mrs. Terence knows her value and is the only person (Other than Dan) completely unafraid of Mrs. Bramson. Does not suffer fools (or anyone else, for that matter) gladly. Runs everyone in the household with an iron fist and a sarcastic wit.  Late 40’s -50’s 

INSPECTOR BELSIZE:  Remarkable composure and precision, with a penetrating gaze, he is unsettling in his focus.  Poirot without the screw-ups, Holmes without the cocaine habit. Can be charming when needed; keeps his cards very close to his vest; suspects everyone. 40’s-vigorous 60’s 

DORA PARKOE: Sweet but utterly unburdened by intellect. Terrified of Mrs. Bramson and ruled by Mrs. Terence, completely smitten with Dan, who’s gotten her preggers. Late teens to 20.  See dialect note above. 

NURSE LIBBY: Practical, competent, can work a difficult patient like nobody’s business. A cheerful demeanor, but you know she can bend an elbow after work and rag on her randomly exasperating charges. 

Rehearsals beginning October 1st, 2019. Previews October 22nd and 23rd. Performances October 24th - November 10th (Wednesdays 7:30p, Thursdays-Saturdays 8p, Saturdays 4p, Sundays 2:30p). 

 

For the audition:  

Specific requests with what to prepare will be provided upon receiving an audition slot. Sides will be provided. 

Please bring two copies of headshot and resume. Callbacks will be scheduled by appointment. 

If you have any questions at all, don’t hesitate to contact Michael Vine (mvine@nullget.org). 

 

Best, 

Anita Allen-Farley, Producing Artistic Director 
James Donadio, Associate Artistic Director  
Caroline Caldwell, Production Manager 
Michael Vine, Assistant Casting Director